What If I Don’t Want To Live Like A Local When I Travel?

I’ve heard the refrain “It’s so touristy there” many times when talking about visiting a location. It’s usually said by someone who insists that the only way to travel is to “Live like a local.” The more I think about it, I just don’t understand what people have against those who act like a tourist when they travel.

If someone’s never been to New York City before and is only going to be there for three days, what’s wrong about going to look at Times Square or Rockefeller Center? Do we expect people not to visit the sights that brought them to a city in the first place? That would be like going to the Grand Canyon and never looking at it, or not seeing the Eiffel Tower when going to Paris.

Natchez

When we went to New Orleans, we went to Jackson Square, stood in line for beignets at Cafe du Monde, went on a riverboat ride and visited Preservation Hall to listen to some Jazz. All of those things would be considered “touristy” but it didn’t make them any less fun.

Honestly, I’m not even sure what traveling like a local means. Do I have to stay at an Airbnb which is 45 minutes outside of the city and take the bus everywhere, shop at the nearby supermarket and cook all of my meals in my apartment? If I wanted to do that, I could have just stayed at home. People don’t want to act like a local when they’re on vacation. What some people want is to “feel like a local.” This idealized vision of acting like you live there by checking out a local coffeehouse or bar and spending time going for a walk in the park.

Is this actually what locals do? Who knows, but it’s what we’d like to think they do. It’s more likely they do exactly what we do when at home. Go to work, come home, eat dinner and then surf the net or watch Netflix and go to bed, to repeat over and over, while all the time planning and dreaming about their next vacation.

Part of the point of traveling is getting away from your routine. Traveling to see these iconic places you’ve only seen in pictures or videos before. Sure, they’re crowded with throngs of people who had the same idea you did but you can’t help that.

The only thing I can say is while it’s OK to be a tourist, try not to act too much like a tourist. That means if you’re visiting Manhattan, don’t make a dead stop to look at a map while walking on a busy sidewalk to and whatever you do, don’t eat at a chain restaurant you have in your hometown like an Olive Garden or Applebees

However, if you’re traveling outside your home country, it’s totally acceptable to stop by a major chain. 7-Elevens in Japan are crazy awesome and McDonald’s have different menus around the world as we got a taste of when they brought the worldwide favorites menu items to the US for a limited time.

McDIntl

Final Thoughts

I guess what I’m trying to say is to not let anyone tell you how to travel. Do the things that make you happy and don’t listen to anyone saying you’re doing it wrong. Sure, it pays to do some planning in advance so you don’t spend all day looking for what to do or finding out when visiting Paris that the Louvre is closed on Tuesdays (true story). Getting away from the major tourist areas for at least a bit will help you get a little more of the local vibe but don’t stress over that you’re not acting like a local, because you’re not. You’re on vacation.

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

2 thoughts on “What If I Don’t Want To Live Like A Local When I Travel?”

  1. Amen. As valuable as people like Rick Steves or others are. They always want to push the “blend in like a local ” advice. That’s fine except most people can’t really do that anyway. It’s not like the locals will think you’re actually a local so you are only fooling some tourist and yourself. People will believe anything they see on the internet these days.

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