Celebration, Florida: The Not-So-Perfect Town That Disney Built

In October, 1966 – just days before being diagnosed with lung cancer and a few weeks before his death, Walt Disney made a film touting what he called EPCOT – the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow. Part of the 43 acres of land The Walt Disney Company had purchased, it was an introduction of his plan for a community in Central Florida where people could live, work and play.

Alas, Walt died in December 1966 and unfortunately, most of his dreams and ideas for Epcot went with him.

Although his plans for Disney World, by then named World Disney World to honor Walt, came to fruition when WDW opened in 1971, EPCOT was put on the back burner for a while. Of course, a theme park called EPCOT Center opened in the early 1980s, but it was nothing like Walt’s description of EPCOT; instead of being a community where people lived, it was still just a theme park with a theme of education.

But in the early 1990s, the Disney Development Company began working on a town where people could live, work and play, and that promised to have state-of-the-art everything. Located on roughly 4,900 acres in Osceola County that was annexed from the WDW property, “the community Disney built” was called Celebration.

In the early-mid 90s, information about Celebration began to be let out to the public and it sounded so perfect that many, MANY people wanted to live there. A lottery was held and the first lucky residents arrived in 1996. Unfortunately, it didn’t take long for this perfect, idealistic town to not be so perfect after all…

When Celebration was initially announced to the public, I was VERY interested in living there. I was a huge Disney geek at the time and was ready to spread my wings and move out of New York. The thought of living in a small town built by Disney, and right next door to WDW, was enchanting.

Celebration had a Preview Center in those early days before much of anything else had been built. It included full size, flat mock-ups of some of the house styles, guidelines about what the Home Owners Association (HOA) rules would be, etc. Although I loved the planned architectural styles, I was a little put off by the HOA rules. They just seemed to be SO VERY controlling. I distinctly remember reading about the only types and colors of curtains and blinds you could use in your house. Oh, and not only how many and what kind of trees had to be on your property (that was reasonable enough), but what type and color of mulch that had to be around the base of the tree, the required diameter of the mulch, how deep it had to be, etc. The prices of the homes were also, well, crazy – as the video said, a good 20-30% higher than other, similar-sized homes in the area.

I eventually decided that living in Celebration was not for me. Fast forward a decade or so, and Joe and I bought a house a few miles from WDW property – not in Celebration ;-). As we live in a planned community, we also have an HOA, but they’re generally reasonable.

Joe and I occasionally visit Celebration since one of our favorite restaurants in Central Florida is in their Downtown area. Coincidentally enough, right next door is a perfect example of the not-so-perfectness of Celebration, at the abandoned (and rotting) Celebration movie theater.

I worked in home health care for several years and over the course of time, I had many patients in Celebration. So I got to visit several apartments, condos, townhomes and standalone houses over the years. Some of my patients were thrilled with where they lived, but I also heard stories about leaking roofs, mold, high prices (even today, they still run 25-30% higher than similar homes in the area) and thin walls. And as much as I loved the idea of living in Celebration way back when, it’s slowly evolved to me of being, as others have said, something akin to The Truman Show.

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Like it or lump it, Celebration is a bona fide town and it’s still something of a tourist destination in its own right. With the town owners still wielding so much control over aesthetics, it’s still a pretty little place. So except for its strip mall near Rt. 192 that looks pretty much like any other strip mall in the country, it’s a fun place to drive around, just to look at. If you’re in town during Halloween or Christmas, it’s an especially nice location to admire the residents’ decorations.

Of course, I know some people who reside in Celebration and adore living there. So as always, Your Mileage May Vary. As for me, as the old saying goes, it’s a nice place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there 😉

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

6 thoughts on “Celebration, Florida: The Not-So-Perfect Town That Disney Built”

  1. I looked at Celebration when new also. It was nice, but way overpriced. Fast forward to two years ago, I bought a house in Cypress Gardens. Came down to sign the paperwork, my father fell at the airport. We stopped at Celebration hospital. Really nice actually. Way nicer than any other hospital I’ve ever been to. But the clientele was kinda crummy. It didn’t look like the Disney crowd. It was immigrants and the scummy people you see in Poinciana. Was very glad we didn’t buy there at that point. Been to Winter Haven hospital half a dozen times since then (he died in January), and it’s not much better, so I guess you can’t judge a location by the hospital.

  2. Celebration is a wonderful place to live. Even though it may not be perfect, it is as close to perfect as a town can get. Do not judge it because you have never lived in our town even though you live close. It is funny how people like to comment on its imperfections but yet come to our town frequently to enjoy everything it has to offer. The residents here pay the extra cost of living so visitors like you can enjoy it and all its functions, too. It does not bother us though to pay the extra costs, because we love it and would not want to live anywhere else.

    1. Hi Anna and thanks for writing. I am genuinely very happy that you enjoy living in Celebration. However that doesn’t mean it’s for everyone.

      As I said, the HOA rules had a lot of to do with why I didn’t want to live there, as did the price. So yeah, in my judgement, it’s not a place where I would personally want to live. Instead I found a house with more square footage on a 75′ x 110′ lot for 30% less than what a Celebration house would have cost, along with a HOA that cares much less about, for example, my mulch and curtains. And that is perfect for me, just as Celebration is apparently perfect for you.

      So it’s all good. 🙂

  3. I worked there for 13 years, running the post office and was very involved in the community. The biggest misconception is about the residents. The people in the town are a much closer knit group of people than any I have seen elsewhere. When someone in town has any misfortunes people pull together to come to their neighbors aid like nowhere else. They had to live through more scrutiny from media around the world because of Disney. They weathered 2 books written about the towns beginnings in the first 3 years of existence and neither were close to accurate. The people make the town and Celebration has great people. There are problems like any town but it’s always magnified because it’s Celebration. There are enough families who have left and subsequently returned later because it is a unique place.

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