What Not To Watch On A Plane, China’s Doing WHAT?, An Odd/Important Thing To Do When You Board, & More!

Happy Sunday to all of our travel friends, both near and far! Here are some articles we’ve read from other bloggers (and other sources) that we think you may like, as well, so we’re passing them along.

Continue reading “What Not To Watch On A Plane, China’s Doing WHAT?, An Odd/Important Thing To Do When You Board, & More!”

The Broadway Musical Based Around The Darkest Event Of U.S. Aviation History

Sharon and I make no secret about our love for Broadway and, in particular, our love for Broadway musicals. Most of the current shows seem to be based on movies or around the songs of a famous musician. Coming up with an original idea isn’t easy and there’s no safety net of a built-in audience. So when someone pitched a musical about events that happened during 9/11, I’d imagine the initial response wasn’t very positive. But that’s exactly what the show “Come From Away” is about. And believe it or not, it’s one of the most endearing, uplifting and inspiring things I’ve seen in quite a while. The fact that the story is based around aviation didn’t hurt my investment level in the show any, either.

Everyone who was alive that day has a story of what they were doing. Knowing the audience of this website, I’d imagine there were a few of you who were flying or due to fly that day. “Come From Away” is based on the stories of people who were just in that situation, flying on a plane when the events of 9/11 happened.

Continue reading “The Broadway Musical Based Around The Darkest Event Of U.S. Aviation History”

Should You Get a U.S. Passport Card?

You know what documents you need to get on an airplane. For most people in the U.S., you show your driver’s license to the TSA agent at the checkpoint. If you’re taking an international flight, you’ll have your passport with you and might use that instead. The TSA currently allows many different forms of identification to get past the security checkpoint. Here’s the list from tsa.gov:

  • Driver’s licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
  • U.S. passport
  • U.S. passport card
  • DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
  • U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
  • Permanent resident card
  • Border crossing card
  • DHS-designated enhanced driver’s license
  • Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
  • HSPD-12 PIV card
  • Foreign government-issued passport
  • Canadian provincial driver’s license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
  • Transportation worker identification credential
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
  • U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential

I’ve seen U.S. passport cards before but never thought they were good for much. When my dad showed me he had gotten one, I thought it was a waste of money since he also got his passport at the same time.

What can you use a U.S. passport card for, anyway?

Continue reading “Should You Get a U.S. Passport Card?”

Where’s Your Happy Place?

Your happy place is where you just feel right. It may be somewhere you visit often or somewhere you’ve only been once. It’s a place that envelops you and covers you in a feeling of happiness and joy. It’s a place where you’re sad when you have to leave and all you can think about is how and when you’re going to get back.

Before Guinan shows up and reminds me that I’m stealing the description of the Nexus from Star Trek: Generations, let me explain.

Guinan TNG

A happy place means something different to everyone. Continue reading “Where’s Your Happy Place?”

Adventures By Disney: Bringing Disney Magic Around The World

The Walt Disney Company has always been trying to expand the Disney brand experience outside of their theme parks. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Disney unsuccessfully tried to build different types of theme parks with the unrealized Disney’s America concept and the Port Disney project, which eventually morphed into Tokyo DisneySea. After these missteps and the eventual failure of the DisneyQuest concept, (which eventually lead to the closing of the final location at Walt Disney World), the company smartly changed course. Instead of trying to build Disney around the world, why not take people around the world “the Disney Way?”

The first step of this initiative was Disney’s launch into the cruise business in 1998, with Disney Cruise Line. The executives noticed the success of the cruise division and looked for a way to replicate the model, but somewhere they didn’t have to build multi-million dollar cruise ships. There are iconic places around the world that people want to visit, why can’t Disney take them there. IRL.

That’s how I imagine Adventures By Disney was born. Continue reading “Adventures By Disney: Bringing Disney Magic Around The World”