What Airport Lounges Can You Get Into With The American Express (AMEX) Platinum Card?

The American Express (AMEX) Platinum card is designed for the jet setter crowd. While the personal Platinum card carries a steep $550 annual fee, if you want to learn more about the benefits of the Platinum card, you can check out our full review HEREWhile the card is marketed to those who can afford the luxury items advertised in the Departures magazine that’s included with your card membership, many benefits of the Platinum card can help travelers who aren’t in the top 0.01 percent. One of those benefits is access to several different types of airport club lounges. It can be hard to keep track of which lounges the card will get you into and the requirements for each, thus the need for this post. To clarify, access to lounges is a perk of the Personal Platinum, Business Platinum and variants of these cards.

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Heads up that other American Express Cards with platinum in the name, like the Delta Airlines Platinum or Optima Platinum, don’t get the same lounge access.

American Express does have a very handy lounge locator on their website. If you type in the airport, they’ll tell you all the places you can get into and which type of lounge that location is. If you have several lounges at an airport to choose from, here’s a link to our article about a website that provides reviews of over 2,500 lounges in 850+ airports worldwide.

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Flying JetBlue From NYC? No More Lounge Access For You

One of things that made flying to/from New York on JetBlue so nice was if you had an American Express Platinum card, you had access to an airport lounge regardless of whether you flew out of JFK, LaGuardia or Newark airport. If you had a Priority Pass card from any of the different sources available to get a membership, you could also use a lounge at Newark airport.

Due to a series of unfortunate events, you no longer have easy access to a lounge from JetBlue gates at any of the New York Airports.

Here’s a breakdown of what happened:

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Here’s How You Can Get Into Airport Lounges When Flying JetBlue from New York to Orlando

One of the big perks of being a frequent flyer with one of the “big three” U.S. airlines (American, Delta and United) is access to their airport lounges. These spaces are a quite less crowded place to wait for your flight compared to the loud chaos that usually is the norm near the gates. If you’re lucky, you’ll be able to charge your electronics, snack on some cookies or veggies and even treat yourself to something from the bar. Even if the airlines have started to charge for the better snacks and drinks, it’s still better than nothing.

You’d think if you’re on your way to a vacation at Disney World or Universal Studios in Orlando from the New York/New Jersey area and decide to take JetBlue that you’d be out of luck for getting into an airport lounge before your flight, right? Wrong!

Continue reading “Here’s How You Can Get Into Airport Lounges When Flying JetBlue from New York to Orlando”

This Airport Lounge Is Closing At The End Of August

John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport will be losing an airport lounge at the end of the August, just one week from now. The last day of operations for the Airspace Lounge in Terminal 5  will be August 31, 2018. T5 is the main terminal for JetBlue at JFK airport and it also had flights by Aer Lingus and Hawaiian Airlines.

Airspace Lounges are affiliated with the American Express Global Lounge Collection. That means AMEX Platinum card holders, along with their spouse and children (or two guests), can get in for free. All guests also receive a $10 voucher to use for food or drinks inside the lounge.

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The Airspace Lounge at JFK was never considered a world class facility. However, it did have tables, chairs, snacks, drinks, WiFi and most importantly to some travelers, shower facilities. Since entrance was free for AMEX Platinum guests, the lounge could reportedly get quite crowded at times. Still, in most cases, lounge access is better than no lounge access.

JFK Terminal 5 is one of the nicer domestic terminals around. There are plenty of places to grab a bite to eat and do some shopping, but should you really do that at the airport? There’s also a rooftop terrace at T5 that’s free to access.

There’s no notice about the closure on the Airspace Lounge website. I verified the closure date by attempting to buy a ticket on their website and the last day I could do so was for August 31st.

There’s no news from JFK airport or JetBlue about what this space is going to become but I think it’s unlikely it’ll become another lounge. Aer Lingus already has a lounge at T5 for their passengers and Terminal 5 is a pleasant enough place to wait for their regular, cost conscious passengers.

Losing a lounge that I possibly could use is a downer. It’s even more a shame because I like flying with JetBlue. They’re currently my favorite US airline. This lounge closure alone will not change my opinion of JetBlue and I’d still rather fly out of JFK with no lounge than fly from Newark Airport (even if I get to use the Air Canada Maple Leaf lounge while I’m there).

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary