How To Go Glamping, Oregon Trail Style, in Yosemite’s New Covered Wagons

Remember the video game Oregon Trail? The series was released in the 1970s and was frequently updated such that it’s still around. But it was at its peak of popularity from the mid-1980s the mid-2000s. The original game was designed to teach kids about the realities of 19th century pioneer life, including traveling in a covered wagon for months on end. Unfortunately, you or your family member sometimes died of dysentery. Or typhoid fever. Or cholera. Or diphtheria. (BTW, totally off topic, but this Mental Floss “Where are they now?” take on all the things that could kill you on the Oregon Trail is kind of interesting. Well, as interesting as mostly-eradicated in the U.S. [*cough* except measles *cough*] illnesses can be).

dysentery

Welp, taking a page from Oregon Trail (or maybe not), Yosemite Pines RV Resort and Family Lodging is now offering Conestoga covered wagons as hotel rooms. But they’re nothing like the ones the pioneers used on the Oregon Trail. These will let you “glamp” in the lap of luxury, complete with air conditioning, heat, a soft bed, a refrigerator and even a microwave!

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Most Annoying Passengers, Updates To CLEAR, 2 New Airport Delays, Wizarding World Classes & More!

Happy Wednesday to all of our travel friends, both near and far! Here are some articles we’ve read from other bloggers (and other sources) that we think you may like, as well, so we’re passing them along.

Continue reading “Most Annoying Passengers, Updates To CLEAR, 2 New Airport Delays, Wizarding World Classes & More!”

My Top Eleven Most Memorable Hotels

I recently started to reminisce about the most memorable hotels where I’ve stayed. They aren’t necessarily the best hotels, the fanciest hotels or the most expensive ones I’ve ever stayed in. Instead, these are the places that left the most distinct memories. I haven’t stayed at some of these places for decades and we just recently visited others. The reasons they’re memorable vary. They could be places where I stayed during a “once in a lifetime” trip or somewhere that was so unique that it was unforgettable. I think you get the picture. It’s not always the fanciest or most expensive or most popular hotel that you’ll remember for the rest of your life. Any place could end up being on the list. You just have to find out for yourself what places are special to you.

Here are, in no particular order, eleven of my most memorable hotels: Continue reading “My Top Eleven Most Memorable Hotels”

Airline Limits Total Luggage Allowance, Resort Fee Decrease, Funniest Lesser-Known Posts from 4/1, & More!

Happy Wednesday to all of our travel friends, both near and far! Here are some articles we’ve read from other bloggers (and other sources) that we think you may like, as well, so we’re passing them along.

Continue reading “Airline Limits Total Luggage Allowance, Resort Fee Decrease, Funniest Lesser-Known Posts from 4/1, & More!”

How To Visit The Islands Of Disney’s Polynesian Village Resort

When Walt Disney World opened the Polynesian Village Resort in 1971, the world was a much smaller place. Tiki bars were popular because they offered a taste of the islands when most people had no idea what the Polynesian islands were like. This is why restaurants like Mai-Kai in Fort Lauderdale have been able to offer people a taste of Polynesia, which, while being not 100% culturally accurate, might be the closest people will get to visit any of these islands. If you’ve never seen this show, it’s amazingly similar to the Luau at the Polynesian (which opened 20 years later).

Here are the building names from when the Polynesian Resort opened in 1971:

  • Bali Hai
  • Bora Bora
  • Fiji
  • Hawaii
  • Maui (renamed Maori in 1978)
  • Samoa
  • Tahiti
  • Tonga

Oahu was added in 1978 and Moorea and Pago Pago were added in 1985.

By 1999, people began to realize that Disney was presenting an idealized vision of Polynesia so the buildings were renamed to more accurately represent the cultures of the islands. The names were also reassigned to more accurately represent the islands geographic positions:

  • Tonga
  • Niue
  • Fiji
  • Samoa
  • Rarotonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Aotearoa
  • Hawaii
  • Tokelau
  • Tahiti
  • Rapa Nui

In 2015, with the DVC addition of the Bora Bora Bungalows, the Tahiti and Rapa Nui buildings were changed back to their original names, Moorea and Pago Pago respectively.

While it might have been difficult to visit all of the islands of the original resort since Bali Hai is a fictional location from South Pacific, it’s totally possible to visit all of the islands named in the resort today, but it won’t be easy.

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