Home Travel The U.S. Cities & States With The Rudest Drivers

The U.S. Cities & States With The Rudest Drivers

by SharonKurheg

If you’ve ever been on the road, be it in a rental car somewhere, or just a few blocks from home, you’ve invariably come across some bad drivers. You know the kinds I’m talking about… those who exhibit:

  • failure to yield violations (failure to yield the right of way, failure to yield to a pedestrian)
  • failure to stop violations (failure to stop for a red light, school bus, or stop sign)
  • improper backing
  • passing where prohibited
  • tailgating
  • street racing
  • hit-and-runs

Insurify.com, a website that helps consumers compare rates for auto and home insurance, looked at their database of over 4.6 million car insurance applications, and was able to determine the U.S. cities and states with the worst drivers.

The 10 States With The Rudest Drivers

10. North Dakota
2.31% of ND’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (27% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (136% greater than the national average).

9. Montana
2.38% of MT’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (29% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (68% greater than the national average).

8. Wyoming
2.52% of WY’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (33% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (65% greater than the national average).

7. Georgia
2.56% of GA’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (34% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (48% greater than the national average).

6. Nebraska
2.61% of NE’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (36% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (47% greater than the national average).

5. Ohio
2.38% of OH’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (37% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (75% greater than the national average).

4. Virginia
2.82% of VA’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (40% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (45% greater than the national average).

3. Wisconsin
2.95% of WI’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (43% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (89% greater than the national average).

2. Alaska
2.38% of AK’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (44% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a red light [the only one not “failure to stop at a stop sign] (172% greater than the national average).

1. Idaho
3.44% of ID’s drivers have been cited for rude behavior (51% more than the national average). The most common citation was failure to stop at a stop sign (81% greater than the national average).

But Wait, There’s More!

Insurify didn’t just rank the states with the worst drivers; they also discovered the city in each state that had the worst drivers.

From Insurify:

For every metropolitan area with at least 50,000 residents — the U.S. Census Bureau’s definition of an urban area — Insurify’s data scientists compared the number of drivers with a prior at-fault moving violation on record within the last seven years against the overall driving population. The city in each state with the largest share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record was deemed the worst driving city in its respective state in 2022. For states with data on fewer than two cities with a population greater than 50,000, the two largest cities were considered in this analysis.**

Take a look:

City in Each State With the Worst Drivers

Alabama: Tuscaloosa
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record: 22.1% (10% greater than the state average)

Arizona: Peoria
19.8% (18% greater than the state average)

Arkansas: Fayetteville
20.7% (20% greater)

California: Palmdale
22.4% (28% greater)

Colorado: Fort Collins
24.1% (13% greater)

Connecticut: Hartford
13.69% (19% greater)

Delaware: Dover
18.4% (22% greater)

Florida: Gainesville
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record: 20.9% (42% greater than the state average)

Georgia: Savannah
22.0% (10% greater)

Hawaii: Honolulu
16.3% (5% greater)

Idaho: Boise
26.4% (18% greater)

Illinois: Rockford
17.0% (13% greater)

Indiana: Evansville
21.8% (10% greater)

Iowa: Des Moines
25.6% (19% greater)

Kansas: Wichita
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record: 22.0% (8% greater than the state average)

Kentucky: Lexington
17.7% (22% greater)

Louisiana: Lafayette
17.0% (13% greater)

Maryland: Silver Spring
19.5% (2% greater)

Massachusetts: Worcester
19.8% (9% greater)

Michigan: Kalamazoo
14.9% (22% greater)

Minnesota: Minneapolis
17.4% (2% greater)

Mississippi: Gulfport
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record: 15.2% (8% greater than the state average)

Missouri: Columbia
22.5% (22% greater)

Nebraska: Lincoln
27.8% (21% greater)

Nevada: Sparks
17.8% (36% greater)

New Jersey: Trenton
13.8% (12% greater)

New Mexico: Las Cruces
17.7% (26% greater)

New York: Schenectady
20.1% (43% greater)

North Carolina: Raleigh
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record: 20.1% (5% greater than the state average)

Ohio: Canton
28.2% (14% greater)

Oklahoma: Edmond
19.8% (15% greater)

Oregon: Salem
23.9% (15% greater)

Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh
17.3% (12% greater)

South Carolina: Columbia
24.9% (11% greater)

South Dakota: Sioux Falls
23.9% (10% greater)

Tennessee: Clarksville
Share of drivers with an at-fault violation on record 23.1% (10% greater than the state average)

Texas: San Angelo
20.4% (33% greater)

Utah: Provo
21.5% (9% greater)

Virginia: Newport News
23.9% (7% greater)

Washington: Spokane
22.9% (12% greater)

West Virginia: Charleston
15.4% (7% greater)

Wisconsin: Milwaukee
22.8% (2% greater)

** Because of insufficient metropolitan area data, Alaska, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wyoming were excluded from their analysis.

If you live in any of those cities or states, be careful how you drive – don’t add to their reputation LOL!

Feature Photo (cropped): TDI.texas.gov

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

 

4 comments

Bandmeeting November 4, 2022 - 4:43 pm

These stats likely show more meaningful results for policing than driving.

Reply
geminigirl789 November 4, 2022 - 6:01 pm

The ‘failure to stop at stop sign’ being the most common infraction is a perfect illustration of why roundabouts exist.

Reply
Christian November 4, 2022 - 11:21 pm

I still call them traffic circles (any idea why they were renamed?) but in a number of situations it’s fairly impractical. If there’s a large multi lane flow of traffic, how do you avoid running over pedestrians? Do you have the physical space for one? Will a nonstop flow of traffic from an emptying venue or church lock up all other directions as it does in my area?

Reply
Rodney Maraist November 5, 2022 - 9:07 am

Everyone is in a rush and we have no consideration on the road. Our lives are too stressful.

Reply

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