Home Credit Cards How The Banks Say To Dispose Of Metal Credit Cards

How The Banks Say To Dispose Of Metal Credit Cards

by joeheg

Metal Credit Cards are the biggest rage. Seemingly every card with an annual fee of over $100 has to be made of metal. One bank even promotes their card as being the heaviest on the market, as if that somehow makes it better.

There are now even limited edition metal credit cards. For instance, American Express and Delta teamed up to offer Delta Skymiles Reserve and Business Reserve cards made of metal from a retired 747 jet as a sign-up bonus for new members.

With all of these metal credit cards, we now have the problem of how to destroy them. With plastic cards, you could cut them with scissors or put them through a heavy-duty shredder. However, don’t try that with a metal card. I have a few metal cards hanging around that have expired or where I got a replacement when my account number was hacked. I was doing some cleaning and wanted to finally get rid of them.

There are no directions on what to do on the bank websites, so I went to ask them on Twitter. Here are the answers I got back.

Capital One

Several Capital One cards in the Venture and Savor lines are made of metal. Here’s how you can return it to the bank.

Great to hear from you! You may mail your card back to us, and we will be happy to destroy it for you. If you choose this option, we’d be happy to credit your account to cover the standard cost for first class mail through USPS (in a standard envelope, the postage should only require 1 stamp). Please send to: Capital One PO Box 30285 Salt Lake City, UT 84130.

It’s up to you to mail it back but at least they’ll refund you the cost of the stamp.

American Express

AMEX has several metal cards, including the Platinum and Gold cards.

American Express’ Twitter team wouldn’t help me on that platform but suggested that I use the chat function on the website or app, which required logging into my account.

The AMEX rep said that return envelopes are sent with replacement cards but they no longer provide them upon request. However, cardmembers can contact AMEX for an address to return their old metal cards.

Citi

Citi’s metal cards include the American AAdvantage Executive card and the Citi Prestige.

Their representative said that cardholders could call the number on the back of their card and request a return envelope.

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo’s metal cards include the Bilt Rewards Mastercard.

Their representative said that cardholders could return metal cards to any Wells Fargo branch.

Chase

Chase offers many metal credit cards, including the Sapphire Preferred, Sapphire Reserve, United Club Card and Amazon Prime.

It took a few tries, but I did get a response from Chase.

If you contact out to our Secure Message Team at chase.com/secure, or call us at 1-800-945-2000, a return envelope can be sent out to you. Let us know if we can give any other guidance or support. We’ll be here for you

Final Thoughts

The consensus seems to be that the way to dispose of a metal card is to return it to the bank. There are of course other ways to dispose of a metal card. If you choose to return it, the only difference is how easy, or hard, the bank makes it for you to get a card to them.  [Note from Sharon: I have a better idea. Stop using metal cards. They’re heavy and, as seen above, much more of a PITA to properly dispose of than their plastic counterparts.]

Want to comment on this post? Great! Read this first to help ensure it gets approved.
Want to sponsor a post, write something for Your Mileage May Vary, or put ads on our site? Click here for more info.

Like this post? Please share it! We have plenty more just like it and would love it if you decided to hang around and sign up to get emailed notifications of when we post.

Whether you’ve read our articles before or this is the first time you’re stopping by, we’re really glad you’re here and hope you come back to visit again!

This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

1 comment

JohnB August 21, 2022 - 2:13 pm

Drill holes in them. Drill out the chip, drill 2 places on magnetic strip, and then drill 2 holes in the printed number. Save up some expired cards, so you can do this death drill every 3-4 years. I have read that some people take a blow torch to them, which melts off the magnetic strip, numbers and chip.

Reply

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: