Home Credit Cards Sometimes It Pays To Admit When You’ve Made A Mistake

Sometimes It Pays To Admit When You’ve Made A Mistake

by joeheg

You know the feeling when you needed to do something but just can’t quite remember what it was? I had that feeling for the last three days of my business trip. It wasn’t until I arrived back home that I found out what I has forgotten to do.

Pay my World of Hyatt credit card bill.
Chase Bank Branch
I’m usually organized with these things but lately, I’ve forgotten a payment until a day or two after it was due. I’ve started to set up an automatic minimum payment every month just in case I forget. That way, I’ll just need to pay the interest charge. It’s not what I want to do but it’s better than having to pay a late fee, as well.
There are several things you need to do when this happens:

The first thing is to make a payment ASAP. Do not pass go, do not collect $200. Go online and pay that bill right now.

monopoly-go-625x350

Once you’ve done that, you can tell the bank the truth.
While I was logged into my account, I sent a secure message to Chase. I explained what happened. I was out of town. All my other accounts are due around the same time of the month so I totally missed the due date. Once I noticed my error, I made a payment.
In less than a day I received a reply back from Chase. The customer service rep thanked me for alerting them and as a courtesy, they refunded the late payment fee and reversed the interest charges that posted to the account.
For less than 2 minutes of work, and a little eating crow, I saved over $50 in interest and late fees. I can even do this with Sharon’s cards because everything is done online, no phone call (or speaking to another human being) is necessary (Note from Sharon: It better be something REALLY important to get me to talk on the phone).
Obviously, this isn’t something you can do all of the time but hopefully, you’re not in the habit of missing payments. I’ve had success when I haven’t asked the same bank for a waiver in the previous twelve months.
You should always keep track of your credit card bills and pay off your balances every month to maximize your return on points and miles credit cards. However, we’re all human and sometimes things slip our minds. If and, eventually, when that happens, it’s nice to know that the banks can be at least a little lenient.

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

1 comment

derek February 18, 2020 - 3:38 pm

My top 3 credit cards are on autopay but I do review them. The other payments are due near the beginning of the month. Sometimes you can request when bills are due. I know with my local electric company, I can do that. With that done, I go on a bill paying spree at the end of the month. Maybe it’s the 25th, maybe it’s it 29th of the month. As long as I do it by the end of the month, I’m all good.

If that were not possible, I would start a bill paying spree by the 15th and 30th of each month.

By doing all bill paying at the end of the month, I don’t have thing think which bill I paid and which I haven’t. Some people disagree with me and say that I shouldn’t keep bills unpaid but to pay it right away. I think going through a check list at the end of the month is better.

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