Home Airlines Why Are We Still Obsessed With Airplanes?

Why Are We Still Obsessed With Airplanes?

by joeheg

It’s been over 100 years since the first flight and we’re still obsessed with the idea of flying. Whenever a plane flies overhead, it’s an innate reaction to look up and stare. Is it the miracle of flight that enthralls us? Do we get the same thrill when we look up at birds gliding through the sky?

The idea of flying is still amazing to us. It’s unnatural and luxurious, all at the time time.

That’s why we romanticize the past eras of air travel, marvel at the present and wait for the eventual future to arrive.

The best example of our desire to relive the propeller-age of aviation is the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport in New York. Guests are transported back to the 1960s, when planes like the Lockheed Constellation, “The Connie,” flew passengers across the Atlantic Ocean.

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Now a swanky cocktail lounge, you’re able to relive the era while sipping on a properly chilled adult beverage.

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For those looking for a taste of the jet age, there’s the PAN AM Experience, located just north of Los Angeles. For an evening, you’re transported back to the 1970s aboard a PAN AM jet headed across the ocean.

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Of course, the whole experience is “Hollywood” so it’s 100% real, yet not authentic. Still, we did it and the experience is loads of fun

You’d think we’d be over the fascination with airplanes but there’s still something about looking at a jumbo jet that is still captivating. That’s the appeal of runway view rooms like the ones at the TWA Hotel. I could have stood for hours looking out of our hotel room windows (Note from Sharon: I’m pretty sure he did. Just sayin’).

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So there’s still a thrill looking at these “heavy” planes. That’s why it was a particular event when one of them landed at my home airport. Click on the Twitter links to see the videos filmed by MCO.

You know how many times I’ve driven under that bridge? There’s never been an A380 taxing across it. While Orlando Airport does have the capability to serve such a large plane, we don’t often see them come to town.

The Orlando Airport Twitter team @MCO did a great job at documenting the shortlived stay of the Qantas plane in Orlando. It will be back on Friday to pick up the passengers for their return trip to Australia.

So yeah. I still get excited about looking at airplanes. I spent part of the weekend sitting on the roof (in between taking down holiday decorations) staring up at the sky and trying to identify planes flying overhead. Part of me really wants to drive out to the airport next week just to see the Qantas A380 come back to town and watch it land.

And what’s wrong with that?

(Note from Sharon: The views and opinions expressed by Joe are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of his wife Sharon, a.k.a. the other half of Your Mileage May Vary, a.k.a. she who doesn’t mind the fruits of his points & miles labor but really isn’t into the hobby at all. As far as I’m concerned, sorry y’all, a plane is a plane. As long as it gets you from Point A to Point B, it’s all good. Yes, it’s a big plane. Yes, it has a kangaroo painted on it. Meh. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ )

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

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