THIS Is Why TSA Employees Can Be So Rude & Irritating – Now It All Makes Sense!

It’s rare to find a TSA agent who’s genuinely pleasant. Oh sure, you’ll encounter a bunch who are professional and who might even tell you to have a nice day. But they rarely give eye contact, short of when they’re comparing your face to the picture on your ID. And even less of them ever smile. OK, except maybe this guy (really, watch it – he’s awesome!)

You’ll also find a fair share of Transportation Safety Officers who are downright nasty. They yell at passengers. They’re impatient. They don’t explain things adequately. They have little compassion for people who don’t understand because of a language or comprehension barrier. There’s questioning if their sense of authority goes to their heads. And they’re as inconsistent as can be.

But I just found something that totally explains why the TSA workers in that last paragraph act like they do. It makes perfect sense…

An audit was done of the Homeland Security Department and the report was released in March of this year. The 36-page (PDF) report highlights that (and I quote):

“TSA Needs To Improve Efforts to Retain, Hire, and Train Its Transportation Security Offers”

Here were some of the findings:

  • New hires are frequently only part time employees (of the 9,600 officers TSA hired in fiscal 2017, more than two thirds were employed part-time. TSA hires more part timers on purpose, to help with schedule issues, but part timers also tend quit their jobs at TSA at a rate two to three times higher than full-time workers).
  • The TSA doesn’t screen candidates well, and has no procedures in place to rank candidates or to properly document notes on prospective employees.
  • The Auditors observed that the TSA has no standardized approach to train new hires, and doesn’t explain its expectations of employees when they start working (specifically mentioned was, “According to TSA officials at 2 of the 12 airports visited, lack of clearly understanding job expectations, such as pat-down procedures and shift schedules, has led to early attrition of new-hires.“)
  • Starting salary for a (full time) TSA worker is about $35,000. TSA employees said that in some markets, they could earn more money than that at a retail store or sandwich shop.
  • The TSA has a history of not offering opportunities for career growth and salary increases (this apparently has improved slightly since a new program, TSA Career Progression, was put into place in August 2018).
  • Apparently the TSA’s turnover rate of new hires is about 25%; 1 in 4 quit their position within 6 months of their hire date.
  • TSA doesn’t utilize the information gained from employee exit surveys (“We reviewed a summary of TSA’s exit survey results from 10,128 respondents from FYs 2012–17. The exit surveys identified common themes, most of which were corroborated by TSA airport officials during our interviews. These included dissatisfaction with career advancement opportunities and issues with management’s competence and communication.” The table on Page 8 of the audit explains the most common responses from both part time and full time former employees)
  • The TSA also doesn’t have a process to quickly and efficiently fill vacant positions, relying instead on mandatory overtime. Mandatory OT = lower job satisfaction = higher turnover.

So the TSA workers you meet may be part time, inappropriate for their job, inadequately prepared for their job, underpaid, forced with mandatory overtime, etc., etc., etc.

And then we wonder why TSA workers are so crabby?

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

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