Do You Need To Learn The Language?

After my co-worker learned about my travel hobby/obsession/blog, he asked me where I’ve traveled. I rattled off a few places, such as Japan and Austria, and he replied that he’d always wanted to travel overseas but never did because he didn’t speak the language. He asked if it’s possible to visit these places if you are unilingual. I replied with a resounding, “Yes!”

Don’t let the fact that you don’t know the language keep you from visiting a country. Now, I’m not suggesting being a proud idiot and going in expecting everyone in a different nation to speak your language, either. Understand there will be difficulties in communication, which will become greater the farther you explore from the normal tourist areas. These are some of the quaint things you remember about traveling. It’s a good idea to try and learn a few phrases before you go. Things like good morning, good evening, excuse me, please, thank you and the ever important I’m sorry.

Here are a few examples of places we’ve traveled without knowing the language and the memories we have.

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France

France (specifically Paris), was the first non-English speaking country I ever visited. I knew a few words and phrases (and picked up some more along the way like Pain au chocolat and eau de glace en carafe.)  Getting around Paris on the Metro was easy and signs at the tourist attractions were usually in French and English. We did have some interesting interactions with the locals when we tried to hail a cab and the driver misunderstood our confusion as an attempt to haggle on the fare. We didn’t complain as he dropped the price by half.  We did get scammed by the restaurant next to our hotel who brought us wine with dinner (which we didn’t order and tried to tell them so) but we got charged for it anyway. We chalked that one up to the price to experience the local culture.

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Japan

Visiting Japan is much different than visiting France because, on top of their own language, they also have their own alphabet (or I guess more accurately three alphabets). I don’t care how long you look at a sign trying to figure out if the man next to the gate with the spikes has two or three lines coming out of it matches your directions, you’re not going to get to where you want to go.

Luckily, most of the signs in Japan are in Japanese and English. This is true even more so than when we first visited in 2005, which was even MORE moreso than Sharon’s first visit with a friend in 1993.

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While they do teach English in Japanese schools, many of the people do not feel comfortable speaking it. However, if you spend enough time looking at a sign like the one above, looking very confused, we found that eventually a very nice Japanese person will come up and ask if you need help. What amazed us was that they often were not satisfied to just give you directions, they wanted to make sure you got to your destination and would walk you all the way to the correct train and made sure you got on.

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Austria

This was the one trip where we spent time planning our time in Salzburg but I did absolutely NOTHING about trying to learn the language. I’ll admit that before the trip I actually Googled “What language do they speak in Austria?”

I was amazed at the number of people in Salzburg who were fluent English speakers and could go back and forth with ease. Every single restaurant we ate at and tourist attraction we visited had signs in multiple languages. The wonderful concierge/desk agents at the Goldener Hirsch were the most amazing, as they spoke to us in English while helping someone on the phone in German. What’s particularly interesting is that I can remember the two places where the people didn’t speak English – the laundry where we managed to mime that we needed our clothes cleaned and she showed us the price and pointed at a clock for the time to return, and one of our taxi drivers who was given specific directions from the hotel staff.

Final Thoughts

While visiting a foreign country can be intimidating, it’s also exciting. Experiencing different cultures is one of the things that makes travel so rewarding. As someone who speaks English as a first language, I realize I am spoiled that a large number of people who live on this planet learn my language in addition to their own. I’ve heard that’s because English speaking countries have large economic influence around the world and people learn the language of whoever has the money.

My one takeaway is to not let your lack of knowing a language keep you from visiting a country. If you are visiting a major city, you most likely will have no problem getting from the airport to your hotel and to most of the tourist attractions. In the age of technology, you are only seconds away from a translation.

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

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