Why Do Hotels Charge A Resort Fee And How Can You Get Out Of Paying It?

A resort fee (also sometimes known as a facility fee, destination fee, amenity fee, or a resort charge), is a separate mandatory (taxed) fee that a guest is charged by a hotel, along with the base room rate and its tax. They began to be added to hotel bills in the late 1990s and are supposed to cover a variety of things, depending on the hotel, such as phone service, newspaper left at your door, high speed internet access, use of the gym or pool, a bottled water or two left in your room every day, continental breakfast, etc.

Why DO hotels charge you for a resort fee, anyway? After all, they didn’t used to. And is there any way to not have to pay it? Well…

Hotel resort fees across the United States vary from a relatively affordable $20 +/- per night to big cities where you might see prices hover around $45 or $50 or more (I’m looking at you, Las Vegas, who has hotels that charge more for the resort fees than the actual rooms, and fancy shmancy places in Florida that charge over $150 per night in resort fees). The average price of a resort fee in the U.S. is about $25.

Oh, and that’s another thing – it’s mainly in the U.S. where resort fees are a thing. They’re illegal in a lot of other countries, but the U.S. has no laws that says hotels can or cannot charge them. So until they’re told they can’t, they do. The good folks at KillResortFees.com are doing their best to change that.

But why do hotels charge resort fees???

Because they can. I really think that’s the main reason. A hotel decides they want to make more money, so they start charging for things that aren’t a basic bed and a room, even if they didn’t used to charge for it, or if what they’re charging for isn’t worth nearly that much, or even if you have no intention of using anything included in the resort fee. Oh, and the hotels don’t have to pay occupancy tax on that money, because it’s not a charge for a hotel room; it’s a resort fee. #rolleyes

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The problem with resort fees is they’re usually not included in the advertised price of the room. So the room rate looks low, but once the resort fee is added in, that killer price may not look so good anymore.

What can you do about it?

Unfortunately, not a whole hell of a lot. Resort fees, when charged, are almost always mandatory. But there are a few ways you can try to not have to pay them, though:

  • Don’t stay at a hotel that charges a resort fee. This is the most obvious, of course. But it also guarantees that you won’t have to pay a resort fee ;-). That being said, it may be difficult to find a resort fee-free hotel in some areas of the country (again, I’m looking at you, Las Vegas), but it’s worth a shot to search.
  • Refuse use of what they’re charging the resort fees for. It’s a long shot but if you explain that you have your phone for internet (including reading the newspaper), can buy water at 7-Eleven, don’t ever go in the pool or use a gym, etc., a hotel might (only might) waive the fee. Well, more like “probably won’t,” but it’s still worth a shot. Good luck.
  • Did the hotel deliver on its promise of what it was charging for? If the resort fee included high speed internet and the internet wasn’t working, or if it was supposed to pay for the pool and the pool was drained, you can try to have the fee removed because the hotel didn’t deliver on its promise of facilities.
  • Book the hotel with points. Many hotels waive the resort fee if it’s an award stay.
  • Use your elite benefits to your advantage. If you have elite status with a chain, you may already be getting, for example, free internet, and shouldn’t have to pay for it (again, this one is a “maybe” but it’s doesn’t hurt to try).
  • Put the fee into dispute with your credit card company. “No credit card company believes their customers should be subject to such travel scams,” says KillResortFees.com.

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This post first appeared on Your Mileage May Vary

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